Work

If my plan for craft domination doesn’t work out, there will hopefully come a point in the future when I will be well enough to look for a job. I don’t know yet what role it will be but based on the current economic climate, there will be a lot of competition for it. Humour me for a minute while I take you through my work history since leaving University in June 2007 and just for interest the reason I left each role.

  • July 2007-September 2007 – Geoscience intern, BP (temporary position)
  • November 2007-June 2008 – Temporarary worker (sickness record became too bad to continue getting roles)
  • August 2008-October 2008 – Health Care Assistant (hounded out by occy health witchery)
  • May 2009 – August 2009 – part time First Aid Trainer (left to go to University)
  • September 2009 – December 2009 – Nursing student (dropped out as too unwell)
  • …..

As you can see, there is no consistency of role there and rather a lot of substantial gaps. As fro references, I have one from the school I volunteered at one day a week (definitely not an area I want to work in) and for the other, I have a character reference from a family friend.

It is now illegal to ask people about their medical history at interviews. This can only be a good thing. It goes some way towards preventing discrimination at the interview stage against people with disabilities.

However, imagine you’re a big boss type. You’ve received 50 applications for your new role and have one space left in your interview schedule. There are two halfway decent candidates left to choose from. Both have no/equal relevant experience and both are equally well qualified academically. Candidate A has a consistent work history and up to date work related references. Candidate B has a work history and references similar to mine.

It’s pretty obvious which one you’re going to interview. Unfortunately, I don’t need to declare ‘I have a mental health problem’ all over my CV, my history does it all for me.

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One Response to Work

  1. […] I’m working on, and, again, I believe one day I’ll get there. Anickdaler talks about the difficulty in finding a job when you’ve been ill and had to take time off for your mental […]

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